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Thursday, August 23, 2012

My Executive Secretary

I lost my executive secretary. I don't know what happened to her. I think she disappeared several months ago, but I'm not sure. It took me a long time to even realize she was gone.

She was an excellent secretary. She could keep me up to date on the conversation going on in the Parkinson's Chat Room, proof-read my newest blog story for typos, help me come up with words that rhymed for my songs, pay all the bills, keep my checkbook balanced, give me the proper answer to the question my Wonderful Husband just asked, remind me to take my pills and wash my cereal bowl, and she could do it all at the same time. She had been with me all my life. She was the one who got me those straight A's in school and the near perfect SAT scores. She took care of the serious stuff, so that I could have fun. She was a part of me.
YumaBev being silly

My cereal bowl was the first clue that something was wrong. When I would get it out of the cabinet in the morning, it wasn't where it should be. One day, my Wonderful Husband asked me about the Chat Room and I realized I hadn't been in there in weeks. The bills were still being paid, but they weren't being filed away. Her usually tidy desk was a mess. It was around this time that I realized she was gone.

I tried to figure out where she went, and why. I think she left because of the working conditions. I think she got tired of all the drugs that were flowing through her work station and just decided to sneak out one day. I wasn't sure what to do. I needed her. I was not handling her disappearance well. I decided to see if I could find her and convince her to return. 

I asked my neurologist if we could do anything about the drug problem. I was convinced it was the increase of a certain drug I was taking that caused her to leave. By my best guess, she left shortly after my dosing of this drug doubled. He suggested DBS, the Deep Brain Stimulation surgery. He said it should decrease the drug situation, but didn't know if my executive secretary would return. 

I wasn't sure I was ready for brain surgery, so he adjusted my medications instead. After a few weeks, I started to see a difference. The cereal bowl was back in it's place. (It turns out that I was leaving it on the counter and my Wonderful Husband was washing it and putting it away). The pile of paid bills was being filed. I found time to tackle a sewing project and found that I could chat at the same time. My executive secretary was back! She wasn't as good as she once was, but after all, what could I expect? She has Parkinson's, too, and all those drugs I take, go right across her desk.

She and I had a long talk one day and we decided to consider the DBS surgery. I am taking medicine every three hours from the time I wake up until the time I go to bed and she thinks that is excessive. We sat down and had a long discussion with my Wonderful Husband, we explained, as best we could, what had been going on. The idea of brain surgery scares the daylights out of him. I can't say I'm exactly thrilled about the prospect, but I want to keep my executive secretary happy. I need her. 
My Executive Secretary
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12 comments:

  1. Oh big hugs to you babe. It's something I totally relate to. I miss the old me terribly. xx

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  2. mine left a long time ago, and her replacement is hopeless!

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  3. i feel the same way lately but at the same time also know i need to increase my meds due to symptoms breaking through so i can relate as well

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  4. I also lost my assistant , but it was a long time ago. I was taking my meds every 3 hours (24 hours per day). I would set the alarm to take the night doses. Over the course of one year, I took more than 80 combinations of about 10 drugs. That’s changing meds or doses every 4 to 5 days. I too considered the deep brain stimulation surgery, and was scared to death of it. I finally decided to go ahead about 1.5 years ago and it was the best decision I’ve ever made. Just before the surgery I was taking about 25 sinamet (25/10) per day and was regularly experiencing hallucinations, compulsive behavior, major dyskinesias, and lots more. I’m down to about 4 sinamet per day and have almost no dyskinesias, hallucinations, compulsive behavior, etc. We’re still working on hamstring muscle cramps but that the main thing.

    I know its a very difficult decision, but hope that sharing my experience will make that decision a little easier. Good luck and keep up the songwriting and humor. I love it.

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  5. I can so totally relate to this. I asked my neurosurgeon if he could keep an eye out for loose wires in the math section of my brain. Instead, I think he may have snipped the wires that attach my mouth to my brain.
    I wrote an article called "I want a wife, too". I have noticed that of the men who have Parkinsons, their wives come with them to appointments and support groups, they keep their calendars up to date and make sure they take their pills. I need a wife too!

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  6. as usual, you have written a wonderful article! and of course, I'll be sharing it!

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  7. For me, DBS would be a very last resort. I just deal with the drugs as best I can. My Executive Secretary is still with me, thank goodness. I'm afraid he's slacking though, and I really need him...
    Stephen

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  8. Hi there everyone, it's my first visit at this site, and paragraph is really fruitful in support of me, keep up posting such posts. personal assistant

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  9. This nearly brought me to tears, because it describes exactly what I've been going through.
    Michael

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  10. Thank you for this article!! I'm going to share it with my family to see if it helps them understand. I miss my assistant and would welcome her back anytime! ❤️

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  11. This is just wonderful read, I wish my Executive Secretary would return. This is exactly what I needed today. Thank you. Frances

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  12. We are on the same boat. Good for you, you have DBS. Now you're ahead.. but that's ok. You make me laugh anyway and inform me in your most funny way.
    Maria

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